Mango

Mangifera indica


Watering
Intermediate

Cultivation
transplanted

Harvesting
1 - 365 days

Labour
Intermediate

Sunlight
full sun

pH Value
5.5 - 7.5

Temperature
0°C - 0°C

Fertilization
High


Mango

Introduction

The mango fruit is of high economic importance and is popular with consumers due to its good taste and wide range of varieties. It is nutritionally rich in vitamin A and C. The wood of the mango tree can also be used for timber and religious purposes. Leaves can be fed to cattle as fodder.

Care

If possible, cultivate mango plants from the mother-tree of your desired cultivar. When transplanting from nursery, it is important to keep as much of the root system in tact. Light but frequent irrigation is advised. High quantities of organic manure has also been found to be more beneficial for mango growth than chemical fertilizers. Plant training is important to give the mango a desirable shape. Regular pruning should be carried about, especially in the first 3-4 years of growth. Annual pruning, however, is not necessary due to the natural dome-shaped growth of the tree. Utmost care should be taken when harvesting fruits to avoid injury.

Soil

Mango can grow successfully on wide range of soils, with red loamy soil being optimal. Soils should have a good capacity for water retention, but poorly-drained soils will limit growth. Deep (greater than 1.2m), alluvial soils with organic matter will facilitate the best growth. For these reasons, cultivation in plains rather than on hills is preferred.

Climate

Mango grows well in most tropical and sub-tropical regions but is highly sensitive both severe heat and frost. Varied rain distribution across the cropping stages is crucial for a successful harvest. For example, dry weather is good for pollination during flowering, while rainy weather helps with fruit development. High wind can be damaging to mango trees.

Probable Diseases

Select a growth stage to see the diseases that threaten your crop during that period.

Mango

Mango

Learn all about how to grow it in Plantix!


Mango

Mangifera indica

Mango
USE PLANTIX NOW!

Introduction

The mango fruit is of high economic importance and is popular with consumers due to its good taste and wide range of varieties. It is nutritionally rich in vitamin A and C. The wood of the mango tree can also be used for timber and religious purposes. Leaves can be fed to cattle as fodder.

Key Facts

Watering
Intermediate

Cultivation
transplanted

Harvesting
1 - 365 days

Labour
Intermediate

Sunlight
full sun

pH Value
5.5 - 7.5

Temperature
0°C - 0°C

Fertilization
High

Advisory

Mango

Mango

Learn all about how to grow it in Plantix!

Care

If possible, cultivate mango plants from the mother-tree of your desired cultivar. When transplanting from nursery, it is important to keep as much of the root system in tact. Light but frequent irrigation is advised. High quantities of organic manure has also been found to be more beneficial for mango growth than chemical fertilizers. Plant training is important to give the mango a desirable shape. Regular pruning should be carried about, especially in the first 3-4 years of growth. Annual pruning, however, is not necessary due to the natural dome-shaped growth of the tree. Utmost care should be taken when harvesting fruits to avoid injury.

Soil

Mango can grow successfully on wide range of soils, with red loamy soil being optimal. Soils should have a good capacity for water retention, but poorly-drained soils will limit growth. Deep (greater than 1.2m), alluvial soils with organic matter will facilitate the best growth. For these reasons, cultivation in plains rather than on hills is preferred.

Climate

Mango grows well in most tropical and sub-tropical regions but is highly sensitive both severe heat and frost. Varied rain distribution across the cropping stages is crucial for a successful harvest. For example, dry weather is good for pollination during flowering, while rainy weather helps with fruit development. High wind can be damaging to mango trees.

Probable Diseases

Select a growth stage to see the diseases that threaten your crop during that period.